The History of Albanians in the Republic of Macedonia
The History of Albanians in the Republic of Macedonia
Since the end of the Second World War, Macedonia's population has grown steadily, with the greatest increases occurring in the ethnic Albanian community. From 1953 through the time of the latest census in 2002 (initial results were released December 2003), the percentage of Albanians living in Macedonia rose 31.3%. The western part of the country, where most ethnic Albanians live, is the most heavily populated, with approximately 40% of the total population. The net influx in the past 30 years has been close to 100,000 Albanians.

In the late 1980s when the autonomy of the province of Kosovo was revoked, and the repression of the Albanian population significantly increased, these developments also took place in the Socialist Republic of Macedonia. The Albanian language was removed from public sight, Albanian families were prohibited from naming their children with Albanian names on the ground that it caused divisions with the other communities in the republic, and finally, to lower the significantly high birth rate of the Albanian population, Albanian families were prohibited from having more than two children (Milosavlevski and Tomovski, 1997:205, and Politika ekspres 10-6-1986). This assimilative campaign can be clearly seen by the fact that in 1990 the amended Constitution redefined the state from "a state of the Macedonian people and the Albanian and Turkish nationalities" to a "national state of the Macedonian people"

In January 1992, some Albanians organized a referendum on territorial autonomy. The Macedonian government claimed this was an attempt to secede and began a crackdown by declaring the referendum illegal. The Council of Albanian Political Parties in the Former Yugoslavia, an organization that represents ethnic Albanians in Kosovo, Montenegro, Serbia proper and the Republic of Macedonia, promptly decided that autonomy would only be a possibility for Albanians in the Republic of Macedonia if other democratic efforts failed to procure political and cultural rights.

Ethnic minority grievances, which had erupted on occasion (1995 and 1997), rapidly began to gain political currency in late 2000, leading many in the ethnic Albanian community in Macedonia to question their minority protection under, and participation in, the government. Tensions erupted into open hostilities in Macedonia in February 2001, when a group of ethnic Albanians near the Kosovo border carried out armed provocations that soon escalated into an insurgency. Purporting to fight for greater civil rights for ethnic Albanians in Macedonia, the group seized territory and launched attacks against government forces. Many observers ascribed other motives to the so-called National Liberation Army (NLA), including support for criminality and the assertion of political control over affected areas. The insurgency spread through northern and western Macedonia during the first half of 2001. Under international mediation, a cease-fire was brokered in July 2001, and the government coalition was expanded in July 2001 to include the major opposition parties.

The expanded coalition of ruling ethnic Macedonian and ethnic Albanian political leaders, with facilitation by U.S. and European Union (EU) diplomats, negotiated and then signed the Ohrid Framework Agreement in August 2001, which brought an end to the fighting. The agreement called for implementation of constitutional and legislative changes, which lay the foundation for improved civil rights for minority groups. The Macedonian parliament adopted the constitutional changes outlined in the accord in November 2001. The grand coalition disbanded following the signing of the Ohrid Framework Agreement and the passage of new constitutional amendments. A coalition led by Prime Minister Georgievski, including DPA and several smaller parties, finished out the parliamentary term.

In September 2002 elections, an SDSM-led pre-election coalition won half of the 120 seats in parliament. Branko Crvenkovski was elected Prime Minister in coalition with the ethnic Albanian Democratic Union for Integration (DUI) party and the Liberal-Democratic Party (LDP).
 

Differences between the Ancient Macedonians and the Ancient Greeks

Albanians in Republic of Macedonia
"Albanians in Republic of Macedonia struggled to end issues in Macedonia"

The grown ethnic tensions in FYROM between the ruling Macedonians and the discriminated ethnic Albanians triggered an armed conflict which ended with a peace deal signed by the government of Republic of Macedonia and ethnic Albanian representatives on August 13th, 2001.

 
Notice

AlbaNur promotes excellence in journalism, encouraging investigative journalism. We serve as the national voice of Albanian journalists Home and Abroad and we uphold the public's right to know..

Goals
AlbaNur campaigns to improve access for Albanian journalists to the sources of information in Albanian Lands. It speaks out against the lack of co-operation and the abusive treatment that still occurs when it comes to Albanian journalists.

Attention

None of the videos are hosted by this site. Streams hosted from sites like ustream, justin, youtube, limev are embedded here. This site is not responsible for the legality of the content. For legal issues, please contact appropriate media file owners/hosters.

 

© All Images are property of their respective owners. Our website consists only free public domain photos. Unless something is clearly marked as being copyrighted, you can assume it is free to use. But if you intend to use an image you find here for commercial use, be aware that standards for such use are higher. Images are by default watermarked.

Capital of Macedonia / Skopje
Skopje is the capital of the Republic of Macedonia. As largest city in the country, it is a political, economic, and cultural center of Macedonia. It lies on the upper course of the Vardar River and is located on a major north-south Balkan route between Belgrade and Athens. For more Click here!
The History of Albanians in Macedonia
Albanians in the Republic of Macedonia, According to the 2002 Census

Albanians (Shqiptare in Albanian, Албанци/Albanci in Macedonian) are the largest ethnic minority in the Republic of Macedonia.  For more here!

Albanian Second Largest City in Macedonia Tetovo

Tetovo is located at the foothills of the Shar Mountain in north-western Macedonia, 468 m above the sea level, on the edge of the Polog Valley. For more Click here!

Archeological Sites
The Aqueduct of Skopje
Stobi
Antique Theater – Ohrid
Heraclea -Bitola
Skupi
Trebenista - near Ohrid
Cocev Kamen (Tsote’s Stone)
Mother Teresa
Mother Teresa

1910 - 1997

 
Ali Ahmeti
Ali Ahmeti is the President of the Democartic Union of Integration

 ... » more

 
Menduh Thaci
Here you can find all the current information on the activities of the Albanian Opposition Groups and the leader of Democratic Party of Albanians in Macedonia, Menduh Thaci ... » more
Churches and Monasteries
St. Panteleimon, Nerezi - near Skopje
The Church of St Spas - Skopje
St Naum- Ohrid
St Sophia - Ohrid
Plaosnik - Ohrid
St. Joachim Osogovski – Kriva Palanka
St John Caneo - Ohrid
St John the Baptist - Stip
Markov Monastery - Skopje
St Jovan Bigorski
Church of St George - Staro Nagoricane
The Monastery of St. Nikita

Macedonian Homepage | Macedonian Links | Macedonian Chat | Macedonian Tourism | People of Macedonia | Culture of Macedonia | Sport |  Old Skopje SKUPI

copyright by www.macedonianguide.com  / designed Shqip by tim shkupi 2002 - Contact: Webmaster